Reduce . Reuse . Recycle

The 3 R's in order are a direct blueprint to the“waste hierarchy” cycle. Called the “three R’s” of waste management, this waste hierarchy is the guidance suggested for creating a sustainable lifeThe three R’s – reduce, reuse and recycle – all help to cut down on the amount of waste we throw away. They conserve natural resources, landfill space and energy. Plus, the three R’s save land and money communities must use to dispose of waste in landfillsThis is important because it sets a priority of actions to be taken to reduce the amount of waste generated,  reuse them when possible and then last but not least, when you have no other options, recycle.

 

Called the “three R’s” of waste management, this waste hierarchy is the guidance suggested for creating a sustainable lifeThe three R’s – reduce, reuse and recycle – all help to cut down on the amount of waste we throw away. They conserve natural resources, landfill space and energy. Plus, the three R’s save land and money communities must use to dispose of waste in landfills

Inspired by the “teach-ins” held across the country to educate citizens on the Vietnam War, Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson spearheaded the first national Earth Day on April 22, 1970, as a “national teach-in on the environment”.  The origin of the phrase, “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle," is often debated but can be traced back to the underlying movement of becoming environmentally conscious in the 1970s when Americans were demanding that air pollution, waste and water quality needed attention.

Twenty-million Americans united under shared common values for protecting our planet. This historic day ultimately lead to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) being created that same year. In 1976, Congress passed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to increase recycling and conservation efforts as waste became a bigger problem. It is estimated that the slogan “reduce, reuse, recycle” was born at this time. Simple yet effective. Those 3 little words with big meaning have created a waste hierarchy that has proven to be a model that is followed today.

Earth Day 1970 achieved a rare political alignment, enlisting support from Republicans and Democrats, rich and poor, city slickers and farmers, tycoons and labor leaders. By the end of that year, the first Earth Day had led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean AirClean Water, and Endangered Species Acts.


reduce

Reducing our dependence on petroleum. Diverting PET bottles
reduces landfill and soil
contamination. Americans literally create tons of trash every year and it’s getting out of control. When you reduce the amount of waste you produce, you are helping to prevent crowded landfills and the environmental damage it can cause. Try to avoid using products like paper plates or plastic cutlery as it usually can only be used once. Reducing food waste is also important – Americans toss out nearly one-third of the food they buy every year. Only buy what you need and try to be creative with the ingredients you do have.

Reuse

The polyester and post-consumer plastic bottles already exist. Reusing existing poly means we aren’t using
valuable, virgin resources. If you took a good hard look around your home, pantry or recycling bin how many items could be reused? There are the obvious items, such as clothes or the extra canned goods that could be donated to the needy. Some items require a bit of creativity, such as those mason jars that could be turned into vases. Families with young children can encourage the kids to make their own instruments out of cereal boxes or Tupperware containers. Just remember before you toss out that box of “junk” in the attic that another’s man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

recycle

Poly can be continuously
recycled without degradation.
This means future CLOSED
LOOP system.We already buy plastic & paper products made from recycled materials. Then recycle them
again.There is no need to feel guilt about creating waste – not every single thing in the universe can be reduced or reused. Luckily, a lot of items we use can be recycled as probably noticed in your own home. Again, there are obvious items such as plastic milk jugs and glass bottles but people often wonder about trash that seems to walk the line. Greasy pizza boxes, despite being made from cardboard, cannot be recycled. Plastic shopping bags are also not recyclable in many areas and have been banned outright by some communities. The best thing to do if you are not sure if a certain item can be recycled is to contact your local provider.